Monthly Archives: June 2016

Using a bitcoin ATM: Robocoin / Lamassu machine at Southcenter Mall in Seattle, WA

This is a fifth review of our bitcoin ATM usage series.

The following story is provided to us by a user with nickname Crow from Seattle, WA. And bitcoin ATM reviewed is located at Southcenter Mall in Seattle, WA.

Coinme bitcoin kiosk Seattle

I discovered this website (and subsequently, this ATM) recently. The overall experience was good (with some exceptions).

The ATM does not accept credit/debit cards, which wasn’t a huge dilemma (for me personally) as there was a cash ATM right next to the bitcoin ATM. So, the machine was conveniently placed next to a cash ATM to address that issue. No big deal. The cash ATM also happened to be surcharge-free for me, even better.

The bitcoin ATM process starts off simple. Buy or Sell bitcoins? Today, I bought bitcoins.

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How to find a bitcoin ATM

The following tutorial shows how to find a bitcoin ATM near you. It was done for the old site design, but functionally not much has been changed since redesign and bitcoin ATM map still can be found on the main page.

After watching this video you will know:

  • How to find a bitcoin ATM in your city
  • How to check current price and fees of the machines
  • How to find limits of operations
  • How to find the best offer in your area

To make the process even easier, we’ve added a separate page for searching a bitcoin ATM nearby your location.

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To find a nearest bitcoin ATM to you visit our map.
To get the latest data on bitcoin machines follow us on twitter @CoinATMRadar.

Bitcoin ATM transaction is delayed – what to do?

Lately many bitcoin ATM users complained that they feed cash into machine, but don’t receive bitcoins to scanned address, or they sent bitcoins to a machine, but can’t withdraw cash. This post is supposed to check what are the possible reasons of this and how to prevent it or solve it when it happens.

Prehistory – Bitcoin network congestion and block size limit

Since Bitcoin launch in 2009 the network has been growing steadily with respect to number of transactions. There was a 1 MB limit set on block size by Satoshi Nakamoto to prevent spam/DDOS attacks on the network in the early days and this limit was left there untouched as there was a lot of space before this limit could be reached. Meanwhile, there were many hot discussions about what to do when we reach it. Unfortunately, measures were not taken on time, and today we still have this artificial limit set in the Bitcoin Core client, which is the most widely used by nodes and miners. So we reached the point when we are literally hitting the ceiling of the network capacity.

Bitcoin blocksize
Bitcoin blocks are consistently full, hitting the 1 MB limit (source: https://tradeblock.com/bitcoin)

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